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Food

Tableau vivant

FOR HOME COOK DIRK BERREWAERTS, FOOD IS A FEAST FOR THE SENSES THAT SHOULD ENTICE THE EYES AS WELL AS THE TASTE BUDS. HE’S CREATED A FEW SIMPLE RECIPES INSPIRED BY SCAPA HOME’S NEW CERAMIC TABLEWARE. SERVED ON THE RIGHT PLATES, EACH DISH LOOKS LIKE A WORK OF ART.

MARINATED BEETROOT

WITH SMOKED TROUT AND YOGHURT

"Preparing the components of this dish takes a little time,
but then it’s simply a matter of combining them."


INGREDIENTS
Smoked trout – beetroot – tarragon vinegar – olive oil – Greek yoghurt – lime – sprouts (as available) – pine nuts

METHOD
Step 1: Boil the beetroot in water, let it cool and cut into dice (if you don’t want to end up with red hands, wear gloves). Chop a handful of tarragon and add it to the beetroot. Season to taste with tarragon vinegar, olive oil, salt and pepper. Place the mixture in the fridge for a couple of hours.

Step 2: Place the Greek yoghurt in a square of cheesecloth, tie the corners together and hang over a high glass. You can do this by sliding the handle of a wooden spoon under the knot. Put in the fridge for a couple of hours. The longer you strain it, the thicker the yoghurt will be. (If you don’t have cheesecloth, poke some holes in the lid of the yogurt container with a toothpick and set it upside down on top of a high glass. The result will be the same but it will take longer. For best results, let it sit overnight in the fridge.) Take the strained yoghurt and stir in lime juice, olive oil, salt and pepper. Cover and place in the fridge.

Step 3: Roast the pine nuts in a pan.

Step 4: Place a piece of smoked trout on a plate and garnish with the marinated beetroot, a little yoghurt, sprouts and pine nuts.

What's in a name?

For the new Peneda ceramics collection, Scapa Home went to Portugal – specifically, a region on the border with Spain where craftsmanship is still passed down from generation to generation. In rural villages, the craft of the potter is part of an age-old tradition. Everything is made by hand on the wheel so that each piece is unique – and at the same time imperfect. And so the aesthetic of imperfection becomes a theme in the design language of the line. Inspired by the Bauhaus movement, the design studio created an artisanal table setting with modern design. The organic lineage refers to the craggy mountain ranges and wild nature of the oldest national park in the region, Peneda-Geres. The ground there is rich in a kind of clay that’s perfectly suited to tableware, thanks to its fine grain and high heat resistance. Additional grit is added to the protective glaze for a dappled effect.

Pink salmon soup

INGREDIENTS
Salmon fillet – small potatoes – carrots – fennel – spring onion – turnip – fish stock – water – sour cream – bay leaf – peppercorns

METHOD
Step 1: Peel the potatoes and carrots, cut the potatoes in half and slice the carrots thinly. Cut the turnips into chunks. Chop the green parts of the spring onions finely and set aside. Cut the light green parts into thirds. Slice the fennel thinly and chop some of the green fronds for garnish.

Step 2: Bring the fish stock and water to a boil. Add the potatoes and let them cook for five minutes. Add the carrots, spring onion, fennel and turnips. Simmer for another five minutes.

Step 3: Cut the salmon into chunks and add to the soup along with the sour cream. Remove from the heat and leave to stand for five minutes. The salmon should still be dark pink in the centre. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Step 4: Divide between deep plates or bowls and garnish with chopped spring onion and fennel fronds. Tip: For a summer version, substitute radishes for the turnips.

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